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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
is the continued united states pre-eminence, not just in demand space programs but in terms of science and inventions and everything else that goes along with it, and it ended up being washed away in the flood of stimulus france. as this hearing has highlighted already, the president's approach to human spaceflight lacks a clear mission and he is relying on the success of commercial space, which i agreed is vital that has dragged its feet and pushed its flight at nasa. i strongly support a public-private partnership for the country's space policy. however, it is up to nasa to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector doesn't have enough funds to do it by itself, and that heavy lift rocket needs enough thrust to overcome the administration shortsightedness. now why cancel inhofe, the international partners who supported the mission, president obama has taken a been there and done that approach but we haven't been there for 40 years and the international partners who would have helped us have never been there. if we cannot lead the world with space, china and russia will i
and assault rifles and so on. they have had no mass shootings since. this is not rocket science. it's there to be had. the problem is that the nra, and i'm sure mr. jones is a big fan of theirs and probably helps them. >> he probably thinks they're way, way,way too much part of the establishment. he's way, way to the right of the nra. >> the political power the nra now wield means that politicians are too coward to say anything. i have people say to me, you're so brave. hot is brave about wanting to stop 20 more children getting murders? >> i don't think it's the nra power. it's people like us, not the two of us, but americans who care about guns aren't doing enough to make our case to the public. >> why not? >> because we think it's their issue. we have given that issue over to them because they have lobbyists they pay money. in the end, the people determine the outcome. and it's wrong, and it's racist and it's bigoted to say that guns are quintessentially american. they may represent a part of america, but my grandparents who came over from poland and live in brooklyn, new york, a
. >> welcome back. then as i know you love science stories. i will do this on. >> some scientists predict melting glaciers and antarctica and greenland the push of global sea levels more than 3 ft. by the end of the century. >> if such a rise in the oceans were to happen it would displace millions of people from low-lying countries. >> some evidence suggest reason accelerate melting is related to changes and ocean and atmospheric temperature, though natural variability may play an informal. >> some evidence suggests a recent accelerating melting is related to changes in the oceans and atmosphere temperature, go natural variability may play an important role. as a result there is tremendous uncertainty in the scientific community over how the melting will affect sea level so the next year. >> fault is back in the forecast this morning. it could be clear for you but then you can hit the fog like a wall. certainly it keep that in mind. >> we are above freezing. 34 in vallejo. napa santa rosa 44 degrees. 37 in san mateo. the fog the big story. visibility less than a mile for napa. down to 5 m
is a great company, we've been this business for 32 years. we have tremendous science based products that are high in health and safety and a tremendous business opportunity. we're proud of where we are today and confident about our future. >> after the herbalife meeting ends, michael john so thson wil appear on skauk squawk on the treat. must see tv. this story has legs. >> as an investment story, i can make an argument that perhaps we're overdoing it a bit. but as a story, come on. the fact as of yesterday this new plot twist with dan taking on where he thought his friend, referring to him only, though, as the short seller. i thought that was a little hostile in his letter. just adds another layer of intrigue. and significant money at stake for both hedge funds. >> and herb greenberg has been on this for a very long time. michael johnson has come on my show at mod money. but he has a documentary that's fascinating. in terms of timely, i've never seen anything like it. >> it has been in the works for months. so check it out if you haven't already. called selling the dream. but in te
illnesses like salmonella, listeria and e. coli. one of the proposed rules requires science based standards for growing, harvesting, packing and holding produce on domestic and foreign firms. the sec rule requires companies that plans for full board illnesses. each year one out of every six americans could six from the board illnesses and about 3000 die. if the proposed rules get the ok companies live for years to comply. >> we will take a quick break at 720 and take a quick look outside at the fog. this is the 680 camera giant traveling through the fog in the foreground. we will be right back. here you go little man. [ humming ] [ babbling ] the cheerios bandit got you again? [ both laugh ] ♪ the one and only, cheerios ...and now... you! [ giggles ] ♪ the one and only, cheerios mommy! i went potty! that's great, honey.... where? for life's bleachable moments. >> dams, as the suspect in the colorado will be theaters shooting is expected to appear in court in less than an hour. the grisly details surrounding the mass shooting could finally go public as a gag order will be lifted and deta
for information and open science good, i don't see how this can be harmful. when we tell north koreans -- i've been dealing with them for years, what they are doing is heading toward a path toward confrontation against their own interests. against their own economic growth by spending so much on nuclear weapons, on missile tests, that's the message that they receive, and maybe we'll do some good, maybe not. and then there is the american there. >> you didn't get a chance to meet with kenneth bay. his son had written a letter, that he was hopeful you would deliver to his father. what happened on that front? >> the letter will be delivered. kenneth bay is way up in the northern part of the country. not accessible to us. but we made the point very strongly that he should be treated properly. we were assured that the judicial proceedings on his case would happen soon. that's sometimes a good sign, because it means it may be wrapping up and hopefully he'll be released. nobody had been -- we have a swedish representative there. we don't have representatives in north korea, advocating for him. thi
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> nobody knows the pain of gun violence quite like the kennedy family. listen to the conversation with the world's top treatment experts. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> two kennedys. i can't think of two better people to ask about this debate. and your reaction to the interview i had with alex jones. what did you feel? >> it was disheartening, i think. just to see the anger there and also, you know, he kept talking about the second amendment. the second amendment, thomas jefferson, who wrote the second amendment, said it should be revisited every 20 years to see if it's still appropriate. i mean, this is -- this is something that was written a long time ago. and he probably doesn't even know what the real intent of the second amendment was. so for him to quote this and just the absole vitriol of it is really disheartening. >> i was just disturbed. disturbed as a human being that this is what our civil discourse has come to. what makes our country so great is that we're about passing power pea
and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> hi, everybody. good morning, i'm thomas roberts. developing news tomming the agenda today. the white house taking action on gun violence in america. this hour, vice president joe biden kicking off day con of a series of meetings the 16 pennsylvania avenue with a deadline fast approaching to put concrete gun control proposals on the table. today, joe biden meeting with victims of gun violence and leapt tiffs from gun safety groups. now, tomorrow, he sits down by members of gun ownership groups including the controversial national rifle association, walmart also coming to the table as a major gun seller. the vice president will be meeting with representatives of entertainment and gaming video industries. joe biden on the force on this president's task force is trying to create some consensus with the actual goal of recommendations by the end of next month. >> process is designed to get input. and the vice president's group will assess differe
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> cenk: so we've been telling you about this stop and frisk program in new york city. it's outrageous because they go into private buildings--the police get permission from the landlords, whether the landlords want to give permission, that's a different question. but they go in and without reasonable suspicion they stop people all the time and frisk them to see if they can find something on them. but finally a judge in manhattan federal court said this is kind of unconstitutional, quote while it may be difficult to say when precisely to draw the line between constitutional and unconstitutional police encounterers such a line exists. and nypd has systematically crossed it when making trespass stops outside buildings. now to give a sense of why she ruled that way well, there was an enormous number of stop and frisks in 2011, 685,000 of them. my favorite number is that 88% of the people who were stopped and frisked were totally innocent. it doesn't appear that they're hitting the right target quite often. i wonder if
: lawrence is a professor of forensic science. cyanide is not easily detected on drug skreengs and a small amount can kill someone. >> it's usually kept under lock and key. again, if you work in the photographic industry, if you worked in a metal processing plant, or you worked in a plant with -- where they work with insecticides, those are places you would find cyanide. >> reporter: soits not all that difficult to obtain? >> it's not that difficult. if somebody wants to get it, they can get it. >> the only thing the chicago police would say on record is they are investigating khan's death as a murder and working closely with the medical examiner. as for the lottery check that had been mailed out, an official with the illinois lottery says records show that the check was cashed several weeks after khan's death. wolf? >> mary snow, thanks very much. >>> and you're in "the situation room." happening right now, tens and thousands of lives potentially at risk in what could be the worst flu season here in the united states in years. a leading doctor tells me, though, it's not too late to protec
picture arts and sciences, and for us. he's welcome brian rose. rose.ase welcome brian [applause]next, we could not be more honored or delighted to have brooke gladstone with us tonight. she is the cohost of npr's "on the media." it also wrote a very entertaining book called "the influencing machine." we will be doing a signing of her book, it's just came out. she has been at npr for many years. including a three-year stint in moscow where she covered the last years of president boris yeltsin's term. i know that all of you diehard o the media" groupies will tell you that there is something about brooke that pulls you in. ira glass, host of this american life, put it right when he wrote, just like welcome gladwell, michael pollan, and michael lewis, brooke can take any subject, even something you do not give a damn about, and make it of interest. please welcome two-time peabody award winner brooke gladstone. [applause]>> thank you, catherine. thank you, brooke, for coming tonight. i would like to start with your book. you talk about a number of media biases. one of favorites is the narrat
actors guild, the producers guild, the academy of motion picture arts and sciences. please welcome brian rose. [applause] next, but could not be more delighted to have brooke gladstone here tonight. she is the managing editor and co-host of npr's "on the media" and author of a highly acclaimed book "the influencing machine.:" " we will be doing a signing of her book. she has been at npr for many years, including a three-year stint in moscow where she covered the last turbinate years of president yeltsin. i know all of you die hard groupies out there will agree there is something about brooke that pulls you in. each week, even at 7:00 a.m. on saturday, i think i -- the host of this american life put it right when he wrote -- just like malcolm glad well and michael lewis, brooke can take any subject, even something you deny give a dam about, and make a very interesting -- you don't give a damn about, and make it very interesting. please welcome brooke gladstone. [applause] >> thank you for coming tonight. i will like to start with your book. you talk about a number of media bias is. one of
to the customer through actuarial science and through claims management. our new role is to create an integrated delivery model driven by primary care providers that uses shared data at the point of care to improve outcomes, lower costs and create a better health care experience. at humana, our model integrates our delivery, data support for clip in additions -- clinicians and wellness and productivity platforms. and in many ways our motto is an evolution with its roots prevalent 20 or 30 years ago. but today simplicity is the key. we believe in integrated delivery model that emphasizes primary care can provide outcomes, lower the cost of care -- especially to patients with critical or complex medical needs, including patients in the medicare and medicaid program. the concept relies on primary care physicians to coordinate care for patients, helping them navigate the health care system so they can receive the right care at the right place at the right time. like many organizations and industries, technology plays such an important role in enabling this to happen. we are investing in today in dat
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. ashley: the s&p closing at a five-year high, but shares of herbalife falling today. let's heated back to the floor of the -- let's head back to the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole? >> reporter: another day of busy headlines for herbalife. here it is. today it closed down 1.8%. herbalife is a name that has grabbed the headlines since b the middle of december. today were the presentations. of course, you have two sides going on, right? you have bill actman and pershing square being so worried about herbalife. they were shorting the company, talking about it being a pyramid. on the other hand, herbalife has been so adamant about the fact that these allegations are i
of expanding sign science and technology will -- science an technology will improve the economy. that speech is the reason that eric schmidt is along for the trip. back to you. >>> we have breaking news now at 8:47 a.m. we are a finding out about the fatal crash between a train and a pedestrian. this happened at about 7:45. so about an hour ago. a pedestrian was walking his bike along the tracks and was hit and killed by a capital corridor train. police are doing an investigation here. and the trains are still getting by but they -- but they are using an alternate track. this will delay the capital corridor trains that move through here. again, an investigation, these are live pictures from newschopper2 of a fatal crash. we're getting reports that this man who was described as an adult male in his 20s or 30s was walking his bike and -- walking his bike and dog along the tracks when he was hilt and killed. we'll let you -- get you more information on this coming up. >>> hours ago, near hayward, a pickup truck hit an elderly woman who was crossing that busy street. it happened at lelenig and m
will also add to that that establishing cause and effect is what everybody wants in medicine and science, but it can take a long time to get that sort of data. what we're talking about here, wolf, so still a relatively new science. it's still emerging. 35 football players that have been examined at one particular laboratory in boston, of them, 34 did have evidence of this cte. but keep in mind, wolf, that these were also players that for one reason or another, their brains were being studied. so there was already some concern. it's going to take more study to sort of establish that connection, but one thing the researchers did tell me is that cte, they have not found anything else that causes it, except for repeated blows to the head. and by the way, not just concussions, wolf, but even what are known as sub-concussive hits. the kind of player where you see a player take a hit, but they get right back up, seemingly nothing wrong, those can accumulate according to some of these researchers and cause some of these problems later on down the line. >> which players, sanjay, are at the highes
not trust the medicine and science. >> to go to a point he made earlier, that is a process that .akes years, we are at the beginning of a long road. >> apropos something you said, i am not against experimentation. i am actually in favor of it. it is difficult to stabilize it. to take the game marriage example, i totally agree with you. so far the process has worked well. it is also the case we may not get enough time to run actual experiments because, half of the gay rights community -- it does not go fast enough, they are going to jump the gun on this. the problem is not totally similar in the marijuana situation. but i agree with you. you need some states that do not go down that road. you do not want the process to overwhelm the country where states that might be holdout's say, it is not worth the trouble, the enforcement cost is too high, what ever. that is my point. how hard it is to stabilize -- >> nobody is asking for a lot. what has happened on the marriage, which is interesting, although nine states have legalized it, a much larger number of states amended their constitution to for
at harvard wrote a piece, an op-ed in "christian science monitor" in december of 2008 or so. ncrc proposed doing this with federal fund through a federal agency. and i wrote an article in "the new republic" in lar of 2010 suggesting treasury could use tarp fund and act exactly as the homeowners loan corporation had done, do this not for a profit but specifically to help homeowners. american securitization forum wasn't for that either. >> i just, real quick point on just clarify my position. i'm not opposed to the in concept the use of eminent domain for borrowers who are upside-down, who are current. i'm simply saying that the priority would be in my view for those who are already experiencing financial distress. when you get to the point of they're current, i think other tests could be put in place. that's why i think there needs to be a lot more detail on the table before there's a vote of yes or no. for example, if you're paying 70% of the your income to keep that mortgage current, do you want to force that homeowner to actually go into default before they actually get help and wreck th
taking applications for master's degrees in information technology, instructional science and technology and management. you can sign up or get more information by going to cal state online.net. >> just about an hour from right now a campus protest planned by angry students, teachers and staff members at city college of san francisco will begin. they are angry about the administration's response to the crisis that may force the college to close. this week city college asked for an extension much of the deadline. the board has warn fire department the school fails to show improvement it may be shut down. >>> that exotic pet found guarding a marijuana stash has died. his name was mr. teeth and you can see why. a 16 year old caimen. it was found next to $100,000 worth of pot. mr. teeth was in critical condition when it was taken to the oakland zoo. it died several hours later. meantime the owner of the animal was in court yesterday on drug charges. he also faced animal abuse charges. >> response times will increase by about four minutes or by about a minute when four stations close next
. host: should they be highly educated/ should they be skilled in science and math technology? guest: there are conversations about establishing a commission that would have the interest of workers in mind to look at where the economy is requiring workers. the economy doesn't just need engineers. we need to invest in our young people. we need people in the service industry and in other areas. it should complement american workers. they want something that works. let's come up with something that will get the bad employers. host: this is from twitter from jeff. should there be priorities for emigration? guest: does the executive branch have the capacity to regulate immigration? in our view the answer is no. fraud is rampant. it is all political. this has degenerated into a political debate. host: what about the plan about qualified foreign workers? guest: there are millions of americans that need work. temporary or not immigrant visas that are supposed to be for highly skilled workers. employers are reliant on foreign workers for various new applications in growth industries. the long
in where we don't trust med sip and science to help us figure out what the answer should be. >> that's to go to a point you made earlier, a process to take years, if not decades to understand ramifications; right? we're at the very beginning of a very long road here. >> can i just -- >> yeah. >> the -- i propose something both of you said. i'm not against experimentation. i'm actually in favor of it; right? my point was simply on an earlier occasion. it's difficult to stabilize it so to take the gay marriage example, i totally agree with you so far that the process worked well ervetion right? but it is also the case that we may not get enough time to run actual experiments because, you know, half the gay rights community understandably runs around with the due process clause in the hip pocket and doesn't go fast enough, then they jump the gun on this; right? you have -- the problem is not totally similar in the marijuana situation, but i agree with you. i mean, i think you need some comparatives, some states that don't go down the road; right? you don't want to process that is willie
guard at pacific bio sciences smelled a strange odor and felt nauseous. when firefighters arrived on scene, they decided to launch a hazmat operation. safety crews were not sure what type of substances were stored in the building, so they put on those hazmat suits and set up a de contamination area. >> we set up a hot zone, a warm zone and a cold zone. prepared to decon an entry team and we did set up an entry team to go in and examine the atmosphere. >> firefighters traced the problem to an overheated ventilation system. >>> new this morning a 16-year- old is recovering in the hospital after being shot overnight. it happened around 10:15 last night on santa theresa way and park boulevard. police say it appears to be a drive-by shooting. the teen was taken to the hospital and is in stable condition. >>> at this hour, the search continues for a man who stabbed a cab driver outside macarthur bart station. oakland police say the incident began last night with an argument between a man and woman on board a train. the woman got off the train and the man chased after her and followed he
of everything, medicine, technology, science of every kind. no world war iii. something worked pretty well. they did something else that was particularly important. they built coalitions of common interest. i will come back to that. what they recognize, if we were to avert another 50 years like the world had been through the first of jeers and we were going to have to define relationships not by our differences but by our common interests. only then could we build foundations and mutual trust our mutual common interest in order to deal with the differences. you cannot start with the differences. it is a long time to figure that out. they did have it figured out. i will come back to that. i think it is particularly relevant today. what he said about civilizations was very instructive. he said civilizations' are movements. they're not conditions. they are journeys, and not harbors. he said the civilizations died. he chronicles 24 civilizations that have died. civilizations die from suicide, not for murder. when we think of the world today in the threat to mankind today, we're certainly capab
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)